Posts Tagged ‘gender’

The idea that there are only minor differences between the personality profiles of males and females should be rejected as based on inadequate methodology. (continue reading…)

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The Globe and Mail

Do we still need feminism? According to many younger women, we do not. For the past few weeks, a Tumblr hashtag campaign called #WomenAgainstFeminism has been stirring up a lot of angst in the Twitter/blogosphere. As part of the campaign, young women submit selfies with handwritten signs that say: “I don’t need feminism because [fill in reason here].” The reasons include things like: “My self-worth is not directly tied to the size of my victim complex!” “I love being an engineer, but I’d rather just be Mom.” “I like men looking at me when I look good.” “Feminism has become a pseudonym for bullying.” And, on a lighter note, “How the [bleep] am I supposed to open jars and lift heavy objects without my husband?”(Continue Reading… )

Objectives. We sought to examine the prevalence of reciprocal (i.e., perpetrated by both partners) and nonreciprocal intimate partner violence and to determine whether reciprocity is related to violence frequency and injury.

Methods. We analyzed data on young US adults aged 18 to 28 years from the 2001 National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, which contained information about partner violence and injury reported by 11 370 respondents on 18761 heterosexual relationships.

Results. Almost 24% of all relationships had some violence, and half (49.7%) of those were reciprocally violent. In nonreciprocally violent relationships, women were the perpetrators in more than 70% of the cases. Reciprocity was associated with more frequent violence among women (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=2.3; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.9, 2.8), but not men (AOR=1.26; 95% CI=0.9, 1.7). Regarding injury, men were more likely to inflict injury than were women (AOR=1.3; 95% CI=1.1, 1.5), and reciprocal intimate partner violence was associated with greater injury than was nonreciprocal intimate partner violence regardless of the gender of the perpetrator (AOR=4.4; 95% CI=3.6, 5.5).

Conclusions. The context of the violence (reciprocal vs nonreciprocal) is a strong predictor of reported injury. Prevention approaches that address the escalation of partner violence may be needed to address reciprocal violence. (Continue Reading…)

Carol Graham and Soumya Chattopadhyay

We explore gender differences in reported well-being around the world, both across and within  countries – comparing age, income, and education cohorts. We find that women have higher levels of well-being than men, with a few exceptions in low income countries.

We explore gender differences in reported well-being around the world, both across and within countries – comparing age, income, and education cohorts. We find that women have higher levels of well-being than men, with a few exceptions in low income countries.

We explore gender differences in reported well-being around the world, both across and within countries – comparing age, income, and education cohorts. We find that women have higher levels of well-being than men, with a few exceptions in low income countries.

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RONALD WEITZER
George Washington University

In no area of the social sciences has ideology contaminated knowledge more pervasively than in writings on the sex industry. Too

often in this area, the canons of scientific inquiry are suspended and research deliberately skewed to serve a particular political
agenda. Much of this work has been done by writers who regard the sex industry as a despicable institution and who are active in
campaigns to abolish

In this commentary, I examine several theoretical and methodological flaws in this literature, both generally and with regard to

three recent articles in Violence Against Women. The articles in question are by Jody Raphael and Deborah Shapiro (2004),
Melissa Farley (2004), and Janice Raymond (2004). At least two of the authors (Farley and Raymond) are activists involved in the
antiprostitution campaign. Continue Reading…

Gert Martin Hald
Neil M. Malamuth

The self-perceived effects of “hardcore” pornography consumption were studied in a large representative sample of young adult Danish men and women aged 18–30. Using a survey that included the newly developed Pornography Consumption Effect Scale, we assessed participants’ reports of how pornography has affected them personally in various areas, including their sexual knowledge, attitudes toward sex, attitudes toward and perception of the opposite sex, sex life, and general quality of life. Across all areas investigated, participants reported only small, if any, negative effects with men reporting slightly more negative effects than women. In contrast, moderate positive effects were generally reported by both men and women, with men reporting significantly more positive effects than women. For both sexes, sexual background factors were found to significantly predict both positive and negative effects of pornography consumption. Although the proportion of variance in positive effects accounted for by sexual background factors was substantial, it was small for negative effects. We discuss how the findings may be interpreted differently by supporters and opponents of pornography due to the reliance in this study on reported self-perceptions of effects. Nonetheless, we conclude that the overall findings suggest that many young Danish adults believe that pornography has had primarily a positive effect on various aspects of .  their lives.

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