Video  —  Posted: August 12, 2014 in Uncategorized

Increasingly, women feel they are entitled to dress however they like but take offence when the ‘wrong’ man has a look, writes Bettina Arndt.

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/society-and-culture/busted-the-politics-of-cleavage-and-a-glance-20120211-1sy7e.html#ixzz3ABiGNdMj

The Globe and Mail

Do we still need feminism? According to many younger women, we do not. For the past few weeks, a Tumblr hashtag campaign called #WomenAgainstFeminism has been stirring up a lot of angst in the Twitter/blogosphere. As part of the campaign, young women submit selfies with handwritten signs that say: “I don’t need feminism because [fill in reason here].” The reasons include things like: “My self-worth is not directly tied to the size of my victim complex!” “I love being an engineer, but I’d rather just be Mom.” “I like men looking at me when I look good.” “Feminism has become a pseudonym for bullying.” And, on a lighter note, “How the [bleep] am I supposed to open jars and lift heavy objects without my husband?”(Continue Reading… )

By: Larry Cahill, Ph.D.

Early in 2013, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) ordered the makers of the well-known sleep aid Ambien (zolpidem) to cut their recommended dose in half-but only for women. In essence, the FDA was acknowledging that despite extensive testing prior to the drug’s release on the market, millions of women had been overdosing on Ambien for 20 years. On February 9, 2014, CBS’s 60 Minutes highlighted this fact-and sex differences in general-by powerfully asking two questions: Why did this happen, and are men and women treated equally in research and medicine?1

The answer to the first question is that the biomedical community has long operated on what is increasingly being viewed as a false assumption: that biological sex matters little, if at all, in most areas of medicine. The answer to the second question is no, today’s biomedical research establishment is not treating men and women equally. What are some of the key reasons for the biomedical community’s false assumption, and why is this situation now finally changing?  What are some of the seemingly endless controversies about sex differences in the brain generated by “anti-sex difference” investigators?  And what lies at the root of the resistance to sex differences research in the human brain?

– See more at: http://www.dana.org/Cerebrum/2014/Equal_%E2%89%A0_The_Same__Sex_Differences_in_the_Human_Brain/#sthash.lKD5UT9i.dpuf

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Mark Saunders

1. Female privilege is being able to walk down the street at night without people crossing the street because they’re automatically afraid of you.

2. Female privilege is being able to approach someone and ask them out without being labeled “creepy.” Continue Reading…

Graduating to a Pay Gap: The Earnings of Women and Men One Year after College Graduation (2012) explores the earnings difference between female and male college graduates who are working full time one year after graduation. The report, which uses the latest nationally representative data, compares apples to apples by looking at the pay gap after controlling for various factors known to affect earnings, such as occupation, college major, and hours worked. It also examines one immediate effect that the pay gap has on many women: the heavy burden of student loan debt. (Continue Reading…)